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  • Copyright information   This page is currently under revision (November 2018)

    The following information is only for copyright in relation to WebLearn, the Oxford University VLE (Virtual Learning Environment). For all other copyright information please refer to the Bodleian Libraries Copyright page.

    Copyright is the legal right that protects the use of an individual’s work once their ideas have been physically expressed. It includes all types of original works (e.g. literary and artistic works, films, images, web content, sound recordings etc.), not only textual works.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/copyrightaware/what-is

    “The term literary work means any work, other than a dramatic or musical work, which is written, spoken or sung, and includes tables or compilations, computer programs and databases.” Definition taken from the British Copyright Council

    For more information on different types of works subject to copyright, see the overview section of Gov.UK

    Before you make copyrighted works available to students on WebLearn, you may need to obtain copyright permission. As a first port of call, it would be strongly recommended to get in touch with your Librarian (Subject, College or Departmental) and additional advice is available from the relevant licence coordinator (for the CLA Licence, the University has a network of CLA Contacts as well as the Coordinator).

    If your Librarian is unable to assist, and the guidance provided here and by the Bodleian Libraries or CLA does not help, you can contact copyright@bodleian.ox.ac.uk  

    Your own work

    By creating a piece of work, as long as it is recorded or written down in a permanent form, you automatically have the copyright in it under UK law. Though not necessary, you can mark your work with the © symbol and the date.

    Once you have copyright in your work, you can decide whether to allow others to copy, adapt, translate, perform, publish, sell or transmit it.

    Creative Commons could allow you to create an open education resource. Though not a real alternative to copyright, creative commons build a “layer of reasonable, flexible copyright”. Creators and users are offered several licences. There are 6 types. Attribution (BY), non-commercial (NC), no derivatives (ND) and ShareAlike (SA)

    More on the Creative Commons licences

    Search the Creative Commons

    You can check this commons Wikimedia link

    Your own published work may be subject to any agreements with the publisher, including for example, copyright over the typography of a printed (and subsequently scanned) article. It is strongly recommended you read all contract’s clause before agreeing to it.

    Your own work will also be subject to the contract you have signed with your employer, Oxford University, and you should check this should you want to export your work to another VLE.

    Other people’s work

    Even if you create a piece of work, you may well need to incorporate the work of others (third-party material). For example you may wish to add pictures to your powerpoint presentation for a class and then upload this on WebLearn ; you may wish, when creating a podcast, to add background music ; you may wish to create a blog using videos and photos. All this third-party material might be subject to copyright.

    Please note that the 'fair dealing' exception (s32) does not permit issue or distribution of other people's work to multiple students, for example via a VLE. Therefore, staff (including tutors) may not rely on the fair dealing exception for material placed in the VLE.

    Text: printed books

    The Copyright Licensing Agency (CLA)  permits the photocopying, digital copying and scanning of limited extracts from printed works for purposes of teaching and learning.

    The licence allows you to copy up to one article, chapter or 10% of the total, whichever is greater.

    However you will need to make an annual record of these scans and advice is available from the relevant licence coordinator (for the CLA Licence, the University has a network of CLA Contacts as well as the Coordinator).

    See the information provided by the University

    The CLA’s information on its Higher Education Licence

    Text: e-books

    Some e-books are available for use in the VLE via the Copyright Licensing Agency (CLA)  (see printed books section above).

    Text: journals

    http://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/using/copy/copyright/quick_guide_to_copyright_and_licensing_for_e-journals

    Text: newspapers

    The University has purchased the NLA (Newspapers Licensing Agency) licence.

    From the Bodleian Libraries copyright page:

    "Fair dealing applies, as above. Beyond that, Oxford University has a licence agreement with the Newspaper Licensing Agency (now called NLA Media Access) but it is complex - the University's Press and Information Office should be consulted about any proposed use."

    Images

    Obtaining copyright permission to use images other than your own is extremely important: if for example you are doing a presentation in class, putting in on WebLearn will require each image to be either free of copyright, or that you have asked permission.

    Ask advice from your Subject Librarian.

    The Bodleian Libraries Oxford LibGuides offer many useful resources, in particular about creative commons sites.

    See the questions on special materials section of the Bodleian Libraries

    Moving images

    The University now has BoB (Box of Broadcast) in addition with the ERA (Education Recording Agency) licence.

    BoB is an on-demand TV and radio service for education. It allows you to search an archive of over 2 million broadcasts, record programmes from over 65 free-to-air channels, including some foreign languages channels, and create your own playlists, clips and clip compilations that you can incorporate in WebLearn.

    Sound recording

    The ERA (Education Recording Agency) licence will allow you to use extracts of radio programs broadcasted in the UK.

    There are also creative commons sites that offer sound recordings

    Alternative to copyright

    Creative Commons, although not a real alternative to copyright, builds a “layer of reasonable, flexible copyright”. Creators and users are offered several licences. There are 6 types. Attribution (BY), non-commercial (NC), no derivatives (ND) and ShareAlike (SA)

    More on the Creative Commons licences

    Search the Creative Commons

    Make the most of Oxford University Library Catalogues by providing links to books, periodicals, etc

    Provide links to digital materials, such as websites, blogs, provided it is made clear those are external links

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